How to Create a Dog-Friendly Backyard

Even though your dog probably spends most of his time inside the house, your backyard is the one place that truly belongs to him. Keeping your yard dog-friendly is an important task that provides your canine companion with a safe environment where he can play with his favorite toys or feel comfortable enough to sleep in.  And you can have peace of mind knowing your dog is protected from wild animals that may harm him and that he can’t head out to explore the wide, wide world all by himself.

Dog OutsideSeeking the freedom of the outdoors is natural for a dog; they are social beings and love to interact with humans and animals. Unless your dog gets extra-long playtime with some great toys or has another canine pal to play with, a dog contained indoors will most likely seek ways to get out or explore whatever is on the other side of the fence.  Boredom, separation anxiety, and interest in another dog are all reasons why your dog may be trying to get out.  Visibility plays an important role in this.  If your dog can see through your fence (like a wire or picket fence) he will be interested in interacting with what's on the other side.  He’ll get frustrated at seeing so many things happening, and a whole other world to explore—just imagine how big and exciting that world will look (and smell!) to a dog.  A great outlet for this frustration tends to be digging a hole in your beautiful just-mowed lawn.

Having a privacy fence may be the best option for both you and your dog, especially if you’ve got heavy car and foot traffic or a regular number of people passing by that also walk dogs in your neighborhood. This keeps your dog’s eyes in your yard and limits the overload of visual stimulation he would experience otherwise.  See some of our great  privacy fence options if this sounds like the fence you’re looking for.

If you’ve got a jumper, your fence needs to be higher; if you’ve got a digger, your fence (if possible) should go into the ground six inches to eliminate the possibility of your dog digging a hole big enough for him to fit under.  Landscaping and plants provides a natural barrier that blocks dogs from digging holes and also stops jumpers in their tracks by lengthening the distance they need to jump.  But you have to make sure you’re not planting toxic (or invasive!) species of plants. Keep your dog healthy and your lawn beautified by being aware of  plants that are toxic to dogs. Plan your landscaping around your dog and I guarantee he will enjoy the backyard a whole lot more if he isn’t sick.

So you've got a fence, a beautiful white privacy fence on every side, and plants, some colorful specimens that have no thorns and also provide shade. What else do you need? To keep your dog from wanting to leave so desperately get him some awesome dog toys and schedule in some serious play time.  As a bonus to all that extra play time and attention, your dog will be happier and less likely to inflict destructive behaviors on your home like chewing things or tearing up those homemade pillow cases you just made. He’ll also have less separation anxiety and the outdoor fetch games after work will be something he’ll really look forward to every day.

Speak to us about what size and kind of dog you have when picking out a fence so we can make sure you—and your dog—are getting the most enjoyable backyard you can. Call us at 888-728-4695 or schedule an appointment  online.