Fence Design Improves Curb Appeal

When it comes to curb appeal, there are few landscape or architectural features that outrank the entry. For functionality, the best entryways are well lit and easy-to-find. But to achieve that symbolic "welcome sign," you may need something more. The basic design elements of balance, proportion, harmony, and sequence come in handy--and your fence is part of the design!

As you'll see from the examples and simulations below, your fence installation can help or hinder the appearance of your home's entryway. The professionals at Penn Fencing will help you select the right fence for your house style and property layout. Call or email for a free estimate.

Victorian farmhouse garden obscures entryway New fence design helps emphasize entryway
This Victorian farmhouse has many lovely trees, shrubs, and perennials. But the entryway is deemphasized by the greenery. This simulation shows how a picket fence can complement the house and gardens, while focusing the visitor on the entry way.

Is your house located a distance from the road? There's nothing like a gate or arbor to show the visitor how to reach the front door.

Picket fence with eye gate Manchester arch and arbor marks the entryway. Manchester Grand Arch  marks beginning of a long path.
Even when your house is hidden behind trees, a good gate tells the visitor where to find the path. This Manchester Arch leaves little doubt about how to reach the front door. The greater width of the Manchester Grand Arch is proportional to the width and depth of the path.

In this simulation, both the fence and pathway work to create a visual pointer towards the doorway.

Before fence installation Before the fence: Existing pathway curves away from door Fence design helps curb appealNew fence, new pathway, more curb appeal: The homeowner could consider moving the path so that it goes more directly to the door. The fence opening in this approach enhances the entry rather than hiding it.
Fence design obscures entryway New fence, old pathway:. This approach adds a fence but obscures the door.

 

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